Audrey and Jerry Giuliano | Reading Real Estate, North Reading Real Estate, Lynnfield Real Estate


Image by Mohamed Hassan from Pixabay


When it comes to selecting a home, every situation is a little different. Do you purchase a house because of its size or is the location more important? Both factors play a crucial role in determining your choice, but the unique details in your life can help you decide which is more important. 

When realtors talk about a home, they often stress the importance of location. However, if you are newlyweds starting a family and you want to buy a home on a tight budget, you might favor the size of the house over the location. On the other hand, if your purchase is to build your portfolio or to be your forever home, location might matter more than size. When considering size versus location, let the steps below guide you.

Sacrificing Location for Size

While location is important, you may need more space for a home office, a workshop, or a large play area. If that is the case, consider size over location. If home size is your focus, the location doesn’t need to be trendy. Choose size over location for these reasons:

  • You Have Children: If you have children, it’s preferable to search for a bigger home. Looking for a larger house in many cities might mean you move to areas where you can get better value for your money. While these areas might not be your dream neighborhood, or ideal for your work commute, they may be a great place to begin a family. 

  • You Have A Large Household: If you have a large family or have multiple adults in the same household, you may be looking for additional space for everyone. A bigger house means you could add play space for your kids, a lawn for your pet, office space, more bathrooms, and outdoor space. 

  • You Need More Space for Guests: If you often have people coming to stay with you; your in-laws, friends, or family members — then having more space or guest room will improve your quality of life. Finding a larger home that meets your housing needs is important, and if having room for guests fills you with joy, then size is important.

Choosing Location over Size

  • You Plan to Rent Out Your House: If you are buying your home intending to rent it out either on a long-term lease or as a holiday rental, your choice of location plays a vital role. Proximity to points of interest and public transportation determine your rental’s demand and supply, and it will have a significant effect on your profit. 

  • You Have Kids That Are Still in School: If you have school-age children, you would want to consider the type of schools available in the area. If there is a specific standard of education you want for your children, ensure you inform your realtor about this before the house hunt process begins. 

  • You Plan to Sell Your House in the Near Future: If you intend selling your home sooner rather than later, you need to be strategic when picking your neighborhood. Location is the crucial factor that affects your resale value — if you are buying a house intending to sell in an abbreviated time, it’s essential you pick an area that will increase your home’s value in the short run. 

Both the location of your home and its size are vital things to look for when house hunting, but your decision on which is more important should be a factor of what you need now. Talk to your realtor about your motivation for buying a home and get their professional advice on what fits your needs the most.


There’s no doubt that we all have our preferred colors, whether it’s for our cars, our clothing, or our homes. However, there are colors that are favored over others--colors that work well in any environment.

When it comes to painting the inside and outside of your home, good colors decisions can make your home appeal to more buyers and get you higher offers.

In today’s post, we’re going to talk about which colors are ideal for your home if you’re hoping to increase its purchase value.

General rules for choosing paint colors

While there are specific colors and techniques for each room of a home, there are also general rules that apply to painting in general.

First, note that it is pleasing to the eye if a room transitions from dark to light vertically--the floor being the darkest, the wall color in the middle, and the ceiling the brightest. While we can’t say with certainty why that is, a good guess would be because that’s house things usually appear in nature, with the sky being the brightest thing in your line of sight.

Next, understand that painting with darker colors and matte finishes may make a room appear darker and smaller. Glossy or semi-gloss paint with bright colors will reflect more light and make a room look and feel more spacious.

You may have noticed some homes tend to have a continuity to them that is hard to explain. There’s a good chance this is because of the colors used. Having a color palette for your home that uses different shades of a color is a good way to tie the whole home together

Finally, while there are many colors that will work in various rooms of the home, blue happens to be the most preferred color to new buyers. It’s a safe bet that a light blue will work well if you’re at a loss for what color to paint a room.

Next, let’s take a look at each part of your home to find the best colors to use.

  • Exterior. Choosing exterior colors, such as your siding, doors, and trim can be a difficult decision for most homeowners. It’s a good idea to stick with colors associate with the architectural style of your home. Also, be sure to take note of the colors in your neighborhood--you don’t match your neighbors completely, but you don’t want to stand out too much either. A good way to differentiate your home is to use a bold accent color on your front door or shutters.

  • Kitchen. The kitchen should be a warm and welcoming place. Colors like white, gray, and light red all work well in the kitchen. Choose a color that doesn’t overshadow your appliances and cabinets--let those be the bold colors of the room.

  • Bedrooms. Bedrooms, especially children’s rooms, are a place where you have more room to experiment with fun colors. Nearly any color can work in a bedroom, even darker colors, if complemented by light-colored decorations and furnishings. If your master bedroom has a bathroom connected to it, try using the same or a color that will complement the bedroom.

  • Home office. Offices are surprisingly versatile. Many different styles work for different people and their vocations and hobbies. If your home office has a classic look--wooden desk, gold lamps, etc.--a brown or tan color will work well. However, if the office is more modern and creative, a white, gray, or bold green or blue are fitting.

  • Bathroom. For the main bathroom, use a bright color as bathrooms tend to be one of the smaller rooms in a home. Bright colors are also easier to work in the mirror by to improve lighting.


Image by MITCH WRIGHT from Pixabay

If you thought we'd answer "It all depends" you're absolutely right. So, lets take a look at the upsides and challenges of old and new homes.

Buying an Older Home or Condo

If you fall in love with an older home or condo, your real estate professional will guide you through the inspection process and help you estimate your costs for indispensable repairs. Electrical outlets, for example, must be up to today's standards... Safety first! Request the necessary fixes as part of the sale or ask the seller to prune the asking price. 

Compare homeowner's insurance estimates and taxes before making an offer, too. A more up-to-date property might be cheaper on both counts. 

For buyers with chemical sensitivities and allergies, old homes can be attractive. There won't be as many new materials in the older home.  

And some prefer a traditional aesthetic. Some of the most beautiful and well-made homes are older homes. As long as you have the home thoroughly inspected, and a plan to handle the needed upgrades, a home with history and character can be yours to enjoy for many years to come. 

Buying a Newer Home or Condo

New homes are made with state-of-the-art materials. They're usually energy-efficient. So are their appliances. Expect lower electricity bills with a newer house. 

For buyers considering condos or townhomes, monthly homeowners' association fees are often at their most reasonable when the property is of recent vintage. 

New homes are becoming increasingly safe and supportive, thanks to new technology. Smart homes can be a little pricier – perhaps 5% more than a traditional residence. Highly desirable technology could add as much as 10% to the price, but rarely more. 

Smart Home Technologies: Evolving From Options to Standard Features 

Across age groups, buyers appreciate smart home lighting and thermostat systems, as well as high-tech AC and kitchen appliances. Owners like security systems hard-wired into the home, and video doorbells. Devices that show visitors at the door and alert the owner if someone's on the porch are big draws in the era of home grocery and package delivery. 

So, be on the lookout for smart technology when touring houses and condo properties. A special mention goes to the innovations that make greater independence possible for homebuyers. New features include a wide range of security sensors, and devices that notify homeowners of medication times or help visually impaired people navigate daily errands, desires and needs. 

Need Support Finding Your Perfect Home?

Let us know! With an expert real estate professional on your side, your home can have the character and features you value. You'll also have support in negotiating a price. And that can help you update a new-to-you home just as you wish. 


House hunting can be enjoyable but becomes overwhelming pretty quickly. After looking at many different houses, they can all start to look the same. It’s hard to remember what homes had what features. In order to make a right decision on which home to make an offer on, you’ll need to remember the details of each house. Read on for tips to help you house hunt like a pro.


Keep Track Of The Homes You Have Looked At


Whether you’re doing simple online searches or touring open houses, it’s easy for your mind to get jumbled as to what you have seen. It’s a good idea to keep a record of homes with their addresses as to where they are located, the color of the house, and the desirable features contained within the home. This way, you can have an overall picture of what you want. 


Know What Features Are Important 


You should make a list of everything you’re looking for in a home before you even start searching. Include things like:


  • The price range
  • How big of a house you’re looking for
  • How many bedrooms
  • How many bathrooms
  • Additional features like walk-in closets
  • Eat-in kitchen or dining room
  • What type of home you’re looking for
  • How many stories you want the home to be



You can then branch off from the essentials on the list adding other desirable features in a property like a pool, a jacuzzi, a large backyard, or a fireplace. Then, you should make a list prioritizing what is the most important to you in your home search. Things like the number of bedrooms and the size of the home will be a higher priority than a jacuzzi tub. 


Look At Your Commute


One of the most significant factors in finding a home is how far it is from your workplace. The closer you are to work, the less stressful your life will be. If you take the train or a bus to work, it may be easier to live close to a station or stop. On the flip side, to be closer to work what are you sacrificing? Are you close to schools, parks, stores, and other regularly visited spots? See what locations suit your lifestyle.


Review What You’ve Looked At

Once you have done your research and decided what you need and want, it’s time to make comparisons. Look at the prices of each home and see what they have to offer for the money. Once you decide the price and amenities are on par with your original wishlist, the house is a good candidate to put an offer on.             



With few exceptions, a backyard shed is a resource that's going to provide you with an array of benefits for as long as you own your home.

If you're in the house-hunting mode, right now, a storage shed is a desirable feature that is usually worth including on your wish list. While many sheds are purely functional in nature, some can be used to dramatically enhance the landscaping and aesthetic appeal of your property.

In many cases, new homeowners don't realize how much they need a shed until after they've settled into a house that doesn't have one. When your tools, equipment, and supplies are easily accessible, your gardening, yardwork, and maintenance tasks will become much more convenient and less of a chore. Having an enclosed, protective structure to easily store your rakes, shovels, and hedge trimmers will also decrease the likelihood that they'll be left out in the yard and subjected to the elements of nature.

Although sheds are useful to any property owner who does their own mowing, raking, and snow removal, some homeowners find them indispensable.

  • Gardeners: Whether you cultivate vegetables, flowers, or other plants on your property, you'll need a convenient and dry place to store everything from tools and fencing material to seedlings, gardening soil, fertilizer, peat moss, clay pots, and statues. A well-organized shed can also help you keep track of when supplies are low and need to be replenished.
  • Swimming pool owners: When you consider the daily and weekly tasks that are involved in maintaining a swimming pool, it makes sense to have a dedicated space for safely storing and organizing equipment, pool chemicals, extra patio furniture, and even floatation devices. If you leave these items outside they tend to get dirty, damaged, or even stolen. Securing and storing pool chemicals away from children and pets is also a major safety consideration.
  • Most other property owners: As long as you have grass that needs to be mowed regularly, bushes that require trimming, and deciduous trees that shed their leaves in the fall, yard maintenance is an inescapable aspect of home ownership. For those who live in snow-prone areas of the country, keeping shovels, bags of rock salt, and possibly a snow blower on hand are often considered necessary elements of winter survival. While some people try to cram all those items into their garage, having a separate storage building on the premises can make life a lot more organized and less cluttered.
Whether you assemble your storage shed or have it custom-built by a carpenter, you'll probably find it to be one of the most useful features of your property. Assuming your available yard space and budget can accommodate a decent-quality storage shed, the probability is high that you'll be putting it to productive use for many years to come!



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